Digital Culture Summer Institute

June 7-25, 2021

The June 2021 program will take place virtually. Students grades 6th to 12th join faculty and graduate students from ASU’s School of Arts, Media and Engineering in this summer program featuring week-long, project-focused classes. Students can take multiple classes each week, on a wide selection of topics. Future makers, artists, designers, engineers, and entrepreneurs will learn skills valuable for the technology-infused, fast-paced 21st century. Spark your creativity integrating arts, science and engineering!

Class Times

asynchronous no set time
morning 9:30am - 11:30am
midday 12:30pm - 2:30pm
afternoon 2:30pm - 4:30pm

How Can Computers See?

morning

Grades 6-9

Students will use digital media examples to learn how computers think and see, and show how computers can be intelligent, savvy, and what artificial intelligence (AI) really means. **This class is offered multiple times with different content, projects, and instructors - attendees can sign up for this class more than once and won't get repeated content.

Suren Jayasuriya

Coding for Change

midday

Grades 6-9

Learn the basics of programming while also addressing social justice! This workshop will teach students the fundamentals of computational thinking through gameplay with real-world parallels. Each student will work as an undercover hacker learning to collect, analyze, and sort data as well as discover clues using pattern recognition. Students will utilize a block-based visual programming language called Scratch, developed by MIT, to create their own mini-game showcasing the skills they've learned.

Trae Waggoner

How Can Computers See?

morning

Grades 6-9

Students will use digital media examples to learn how computers think and see, and show how computers can be intelligent, savvy, and what artificial intelligence (AI) really means. **This class is offered multiple times with different content, projects, and instructors - attendees can sign up for this class more than once and won't get repeated content.

Suren Jayasuriya

Audio Editing and Remixing

afternoon

$100

Grades 9-12

Learn how to edit audio, splice, and add effects to audio. Students will remix and merge two songs based on their BPM, editing them to make a mash-up. For beginners or intermediate students.

Alejandra Rodriguez Vega

How Can Computers See?

morning

Grades 6-9

Students will use digital media examples to learn how computers think and see, and show how computers can be intelligent, savvy, and what artificial intelligence (AI) really means. **This class is offered multiple times with different content, projects, and instructors - attendees can sign up for this class more than once and won't get repeated content.

Suren Jayasuriya
NSF

How Can Computers See? is supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation.
Coding for Change is supported by ArtsWork, The Kax Herberger Center for Children and the Arts

Lauren Copley
Lauren Copley
Tejaswi Gowda
Tejaswi Gowda
Suren Jayasuriya
Suren Jayasuriya
Garrett Johnson
Garrett Johnson
Stacey Kuznetsov
Stacey Kuznetsov
Byron Lahey
Byron Lahey
Robert LiKamWa
Robert LiKamWa
Robert LiKamWa
Don Marinelli
Loren Olson
Loren Olson
Samuel Pena
Samuel Peña
Althea Pergakis
Althea Pergakis
Alejandra Rodriguez Vega
Alejandra Rodriguez Vega
Kimberlee Swisher
Kimberlee Swisher
Seth Thorn
Seth Thorn
David Tinapple
David Tinapple
Trae Waggoner
Trae Waggoner
Who teaches the courses?
Faculty from the School of Arts, Media, and Engineering - part of the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts - develop the curriculum and co-teach with graduate students. Undergraduate students serve as classroom assistants and extra staff.
How do students attend?
Virtual sessions are conducted via Zoom. Registered students will receive an email with a link to attend a few days before the class. Students need a computer or tablet with internet access and a microphone. A webcam is recommended. Except for asynchronous courses, the times listed are synchronous sessions, with the instructor and TAs present for the duration of the 2-hour session.
Will students need to purchase any materials or software?
No. Any materials fees are included in the tuition cost and will be mailed to you. Software used will be free or accessible via a short-term free trial.
Will students need to install any software?
The Zoom application is recommended. Some courses will require some (free) software to be installed; if this is the case, the students will be taught how to do this during the synchronous class. Some courses have additional technical requirements; these are listed on the registration site for each class before you enroll.
Can students take more than one class?
Yes! We’d love to see them more than once. Enroll for as many as you want.
My student has never done programming before. Will this program be a good fit?
Yes! We encourage beginners to attend and we welcome students with varying levels of experience. Project-based learning allows for students to progress at their own pace and level.
Do you offer scholarships?
Yes! We have limited grant support for two classes, Coding for Change and How Can Computers See? To apply, please click here: https://forms.gle/MvbTX5UdBcdF4Fmz7




The Digital Culture Summer Institute was created by the School of Arts, Media and Engineering - part of the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at ASU. AME's Digital Culture initiative is an innovative degree program that offers students interdisciplinary degrees learning technology, design, media and art. For more information, please visit ame.asu.edu.

For questions contact:
loren.olson@asu.edu
kimberlee.swisher@asu.edu